ideas for an alternative plastic-free Christmas box

ideas-for-an-alternative-plastic-free-christmas-eve-box

Ideas for an alternative plastic-free Christmas box

If you’re thinking about putting together a Christmas eve box but worried about all the additional plastic that comes with all the treats and trinkets here are some great ideas for keeping it plastic-free.

Many of the things you might be thinking of putting in a Christmas eve box aren’t made of plastic anyway, especially if you are going down the route of PJ’s and hot chocolate. So it’s easy enough to have a plastic-free box. The trick is being conscious of what you are buying and getting a bit creative

Plastic free swaps

Pyjamas. Instead of buying a new pair of pyjamas wrapped in plastic just because want to give your kids a new pair on Christmas eve why not think outside the box a bit. Christmas PJ’s often don’t get worn much so if your child hasn’t grown why not use last years set, or buy a set second hand. And if you really would prefer new choose a pair that don’t have plastic packaging and ideally are made from natural fibres.

Sweet Treats. While it’s hard to buy sweet treats that aren’t wrapped in plastic it’s not impossible. You could certainly opt for a big jar of hot chocolate instead of smaller sachets, or a hot chocolate spoon (which tastes much better and is loads more fun anyway) and chocolate wrapped in paper or foil rather than candy canes wrapped in plastic.

The Christmas Movie. There are two/three easy options here to avoid additional plastic. Either pick a film and write out a little card with the title then watch online or reuse a movie you already have/buy second hand.

Christmas Crafts. Again this is just about choosing your craft. You could make some cookies to decorate instead of buying a pre-packaged set or make some decorations out of pinecones and foliage you can find in nature.

Santa Stuff. While this is unlikely to include plastic in the first place it could do if you fancy going down the magic key and reindeer food route. So just be conscious and consider making your own. Edible glitter is far better than the plastic stuff anyway!

And you could use this as an excuse to get in a few more plastic-free swaps like a new bamboo toothbrush, homemade mince pies in a reusable snack bag, a new insulated reusable cup or bottle (already filled with hot chocolate), or homemade sweets (fudge and peppermint creams are Christmas favourites) in reusable containers.

For adults again the swaps are pretty simple and mostly just require being conscious of not choosing the plastic options.

If you are making a box opt for no plastic in the construction or make sure you are reusing rather than buying new.

And think about future years. If this is going to become a tradition then you can pack the mug or blanket you buy away and use it again next year, so it’s worth getting something that will last. And who knows these things might get passed on to your grandchildren.

Up next - when to give a Christmas eve box and who are they from